Do you want to become a tree after life? You can with a Bios Urn.

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Do you want your body to feed worms or to feed squirrels? ;)

Once your beloved has departed and the only memento that remains is the ashes, you can throw them into the sea, scatter them from above a mountain, in a special spot… and they will vanish. You can also keep them in urn and put them in a special place. OR you can merge the ashes with tree seeds, so that they can combine and form new life. You will have something alive in front of your eyes, something to care for. The Bios Urn turns death into a transformation and a return to nature.

The tree will survive and grow for generations, in the same way a person would. And that tree will also have its own descendants, new young trees. That’s quite a reincarnation, an allegory of the circle of life.

Even the most beautiful tombstone that makes you shed a tear, will be a cold and sterile work of art. Even the most twisted tree is a unique and alive work of art. In fact, if we think in the current funerary art it may seem an industrialized kind of art, homogeneous – only the wealthy ones can afford the gap and break the uniformity. Instead, the tree is a work-in-progress, you will see it grow, you will see it change with the passing of seasons… And that won’t depend on your economic resources, but your caring and dedication, until that will become a strong tree and it will give shelter to small and tiny beings.

Can you picture yourself in your favorite spot in the forest, in the park or in the garden? And could you imagine the same in the cemetery?

Life creates life.

Comments

  1. Do you have any evidence of these tree seeds planted above a Bio Urn, actually turning successfully into a tree? While your idea is beautiful and lovely, I have great doubts about whether this product will actually do what you claim it will do. Are you aware of the nutrient content of cremated remains, and how it interacts with the growth of plants? Are you knowledgeable about what is involved in the growth of a tree, and of how many seeds it takes to eventually produce one tree that actually grows into full adulthood? If you have positive and solidly researched answers to these questions, you should put them very clearly on your website. Otherwise, I and others will have to doubt the validity of this product.
    Thank you for responding.

    • Hi Laura,

      The Bios Urn has been designed and tested to allow a perfect growth of a tree when planted using the remains obtained after a process like cremation. While planting a tree from a seed with the ashes directly wouldn’t work, the Bios Urn makes it possible thanks to its design. As you can see on http://www.urnabios.com/urn the Bios Urn has a special growth medium that allows the seed to germinate and grow successfully. After several weeks or months, according to the type of tree, the roots grow through the decomposable material of the urn. This way, the tree roots only have contact with the ashes once the tree is grown enough to support them. With the decomposition of the set all becomes part of the subsoil.

      That being said, we always say that we and no-one can grant a 100% tree growth. Trees are live entities and need proper care to grow. We provide a sachel full of first quality seeds, allowing our customers to plant several seeds or re-plant them in case the seed doesn’t germinate. Also, and in case you can not control and care for the tree during the firsts months of growth, you can also alternate a seed with a sprout by planting a small sprout in the top capsule of the Bios Urn. We’ve never received a complaint from a Bios Urn not growing successfully.

      Hope that helps :)

      • I have already planted my own redwood tree to be used with a Bios Urn. Only one seed out of the package (25?) sprouted and it is now about 3″ tall after about a year growth so I think it may be a good idea to pre-plant the tree just to make sure.

        • Hi Dick, yes, the Bios Urn can be planted with a sprout. But its great to hear your Redwood finally sprouted, Redwoods are actually hard to grow :)

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